When students’ basic needs are met by community schools, learning can flourish

“The suspension rate was high. MLK lamentably had the highest rate of disciplinary referrals in the entire district,” said Leslie Hu, MLK’s community school coordinator who added that standardized test scores were really low. The principal wanted to incorporate PBL, but knew students were distracted by a lack of basic needs that could not be met at home. Shifting to a community school model helped students with needs like food and medical care, and teachers like Founds were able to invest more time in developing their teaching practice.

Schools aren’t typically designed to offer more than instruction, but by addressing basic needsthey’re finding that students can learn better. Cincinnati Public School Learning Centers, Oakland Unified School District and even Lebron James’ I Promise School in Akron, Ohio, are community schools that lend a helpful framework for closing achievement gaps and improving student outcomes.

“The community school approach is where

Read more

Lacey man, spurred by Texas school shooting, now stands guard

Meet Anthony Triplett Jr. He’s 31, he lives near Lacey and he’s a nine-year Army veteran with two children enrolled in North Thurston Public Schools’ Evergreen Forest Elementary and Nisqually Middle School.

He has worked in federal security, he says, and he followed that by forming a nonprofit called All in a Days Work to address veteran suicides.

And then on May 24, a mass school shooting unfolded in Uvalde, Texas, killing 21 people, including 19 students.

Triplett’s children asked him if they had to return to school the next day.

“It was heartbreaking,” said Triplett. Galvanized by the moment, Triplett asked himself, “What can I do?”

Around the time of the Texas shooting, there were elevated concerns about school safety, said North Thurston Public Schools spokesman Aaron Wyatt. Some in the community offered to patrol school hallways and some asked if bullet-proof glass could be installed, he recalls.

Triplett

Read more

850 more unvaxxed NYC teachers, school aids fired

The city Department of Education has axed another 850 teachers and classroom aids — bringing the total to nearly 2,000 school employees fired for failure to comply with a vaccine mandate struck down in court.

About 1,300 DOE employees who took a year’s unpaid leave — with benefits — agreed to show proof of COVID vaccination by Sept. 5 or be “deemed to have voluntarily resigned.”

Of those staffers, 450 got a shot by the deadline and “are returning to their prior schools or work locations,” DOE officials told The Post. They include some 225 teachers and 135 paraprofessionals.

The 850 let go makes roughly 1,950 DOE staffers terminated since the vaccine mandate took effect on Oct. 29, 2021.

Rachelle Garcia, an elementary school teacher in Brooklyn for 15 years and mother of two, worked fully in person during the pandemic and never got sick, she said.

But she refused

Read more